Google Smart Lock: The complete guide

Google Smart Lock: The complete guide

Thinkstock Think fast: How many times a day do you pick up your phone to look at something? Unless you live in the tundra or have far more self-control than most, the answer probably falls somewhere between “quite a few” and “more than any sane person could count.” Assuming you keep your device properly secured, that means you’re doing an awful lot of unlocking — be it with your face, your fingerprint, or the code you tap or swipe onto your screen. And that’s to say nothing of the number of times you type your password into your laptop or enter your credentials into an app or website during the day. Security’s important, but goodness gracious, it can be a real hassle. Thankfully, there’s a better way — at least, if you use Google-associated services and devices. Google Smart Lock is an easily overlooked but incredibly useful feature that lets you create a sensible balance between security and convenience. But what is Google Smart Lock, exactly? It’s an umbrella term that applies to three core areas: Chrome OS, where it allows your Android phone to unlock your computer; Android itself, where it provides a variety of options for keeping your phone unlocked in preapproved, known-to-be-safe circumstances; and within the Chrome browser, where it acts as a cross-platform password manager for both apps and websites. Best of all? Once you set it up, it’s simple as can be to use. Here’s a step-by-step guide to turning Google Smart Lock on and taking full advantage of what it can offer across all of its relevant areas. Google Smart Lock for Android security First up: the Android front. On any reasonably recent Android device, you can set up Google Smart Lock to keep your phone unlocked in certain trusted situations but then to require your PIN, pattern, password, or biometric authentication at all other times. It’s the best of both worlds: effective Android security without unnecessary annoyances. To activate Google Smart Lock on Android, look for the “Smart Lock” option in the Security & Location area of your main system settings. When you tap it, you’ll be prompted to enter your PIN, pattern, or password for protection — and then you’ll see a list of available choices: [ Prepare to become a Certified Information Security Systems Professional with this comprehensive online course from PluralSight. Now offering a 10-day free trial! ] On-body detection: Fire up this option, and your phone will remain unlocked whenever you’re holding or carrying it — so long as you’ve already unlocked it once. That way, if you unlock your phone to use it and then put it back into your bag or pocket while walking around, you won’t have to unlock it again the next time you pick it up. Anytime your phone is set down or not in motion for more than a moment, it’ll require authentication again. Trusted places: Perhaps the most useful Google Smart Lock element, this option allows you to set specific locations […]

Full article on original web page… www.computerworld.com

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