The best photo-editing software in 2018

The best photo-editing software in 2018

Photoshop is often used as a yardstick for judging all other photo-editing programs, but is that really the right way to look at them? It’s unlikely any other program will be better at being Photoshop than Photoshop is (naturally), but there are many programs that do things Photoshop doesn’t. For example, a lot of people don’t like subscription plans. It’s the only way to get Photoshop now, but many photographers would prefer to pay a single licence fee in the old-fashioned way. And while Photoshop is very slick and efficient, it does demand a certain technical knowledge that beginners might find intimidating. And it’s true that you can create almost any effect you can imagine in Photoshop, but often only with a great deal of work and expertise, where many rivals bring one-click presets that do all these things in a fraction of the time. Also read: The best photo-editing laptops this year Photoshop doesn’t organize your photos, either. You can do that in Lightroom, the other half of the Adobe Photography plan, but it means switching applications for different jobs, and for many photographers, an all-in-one cataloguing, enhancement, editing and effects tool would be better. Here we’re to steer a path through all these products and choices to find the ones that stand out. Our overall rankings are based on all-round capabilities, but your needs and interests may be specific, so you can use this guide to help you find the software that’s right for you. 1. Adobe Photoshop CC 2018 Love it or hate it, Photoshop sets a ludicrously high standard for its competitors PC: Intel Core 2 or AMD Athlon 64 processor 2 GHz, 2GB RAM (8GB recommended), Windows 7 to 10 | Mac: Multicore Intel 64-bit, 2GB RAM (8GB recommended), OS X 10.11 or later | Hard drive: 4GB | Minimum screen resolution: 1024×768 pixels Immensely powerful Very intuitive interface So why would anyone hate what’s widely regarded as the world’s best photo-editing software? One reason is that it’s become associated with underhand or unhealthy photo-manipulation, though that’s the photographer’s responsibility, not the software’s. Perhaps more importantly for photographers, it was Adobe’s decision to make it a subscription-only product. This means the only way to get Photoshop CC now is to subscribe to one of Adobe’s subscription-based Photography Plans, which many object to on principle, even though it’s dramatically cheaper than the old ‘perpetual licence’ version (which still brought an upgrade cost every couple of years). However, Photoshop is slick, powerful and constantly improving. Its support for selections, masks and layers is unmatched, making it the tool of choice for complex composite images. That being said it’s not just for photographers, but artists, illustrators, designers, videographers and motion graphics designers too. Performance Despite its reputation for complexity, Photoshop actually offers a very clean, slick interface. The are no ‘novice’ modes, but the tools panel does offer fly-out animations that show you how the tools work and what they do. There are no image browsing or […]

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